Social Media

Latest Posts

Cleaning that’s fit for the Queen

Cleaning that’s fit for the Queen, from the best vacuum cleaners, training and products bearing the Royal Warrant and our highest standards, eagle-eyed approach, certified cleaning products and equipment. As we celebrate the Platinum Jubilee this weekend, I thought it would be appropriate to link...

03/06/2022
Hiring a Rug Doctor V Professional Carpet Cleaner

This blog has been written to compare results between Hiring a Rug Doctor V Professional Carpet Cleaner. We were contacted by a lady in Warrington to book in for a carpet and upholstery clean – so we’d had the usual chat, exchanged some images and...

17/02/2022
Cleaner V Housekeeper

Cleaner V Housekeeper – the distinction between the two roles. Often, individuals refer to cleaners and housekeepers as the same, though call me particular, there’s a difference in the roles, cost and tasks. The main distinction between housekeeping and cleaning is that cleaning services focus...

17/01/2022
0151 808 1001
|
Mon - Fri 09:00 - 19:00 / Weekends and Bank Holidays by appointment
Engage with us on social media
Top

Blog

Cheshire Cleaning Co > Locations & Landmarks  > Tameside, Greater Manchester Professional Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning

Tameside, Greater Manchester Professional Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning

The history of Tameside

The Metropolitan Borough of Tameside is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in North West England. It is named after the River Tame, which flows through the borough, and includes the towns of Ashton-under-Lyne, Audenshaw, Denton, Droylsden, Dukinfield, Hyde, Mossley and Stalybridge. Its western border is approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) east of Manchester city centre. Tameside is bordered by the metropolitan boroughs of Stockport and Oldham to the south and north respectively, the city of Manchester to the west and the borough of High Peak in Derbyshire to the east across Longdendale. As of 2011, the overall population was 219,324.

The history of the area extends back to the Stone Age. There are over 300 listed buildings in Tameside and three Scheduled Ancient Monuments, which includes a castle of national importance. The settlements in Tameside were small townships centred on agriculture until the advent of the Industrial Revolution. The towns of the borough grew and became involved in the cotton industry, which dominated the local economy. The current borough was created in 1974 as part of the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972.

History

The history of the area stretches back up to 10,000 years; there are 22 Mesolithic sites in Tameside, the oldest dating to around 8000 BC; 21 of the 22 sites are in the hilly uplands in the northeast of the borough. Evidence of Neolithic and Bronze Age activity is more limited in the borough, although the Bronze Age Stalybridge Cairn is the most complete prehistoric funerary monument in the borough. The people in the area changed from hunter-gatherers to farmers around 2500 BC–1500 BC due to climate change. Werneth Low is the most likely Iron Age farmstead site in the borough, probably dating to the late 1st millennium BC. Before the Roman conquest of Britain in the 1st century AD, the area was probably part of the territory of the Brigantes, the Celtic tribe controlling most of what is now northwest England.

The area came under the control of the Roman Empire in the second half of the 1st century. Roads through the area were established from Ardotalia fort in Derbyshire to Mamucium (Manchester) west of Tameside and Castleshaw Roman fort in the north. Romano-British finds in the borough include a bog body in Ashton Moss, occupation sites at Werneth Low, Harridge Pike, Roe Cross, and Mottram. A 4th-century coin hoard was found in Denton and is one of only four hoards from the 4th century in the Mersey basin. A Byzantine coin from the 6th or 7th centuries, also found in Denton, indicates continued or renewed occupation once the Romans left Britain in the early 5th century.

Nico Ditch, an earthwork stretching from Stretford to Ashton-under-Lyne, is evidence of Anglo-Saxon activity in Tameside. It was probably dug between the 7th and 9th centuries and may have been used as a boundary between the kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria. Further evidence of Anglo-Saxon era activity in Tameside comes from the derivation of settlement names from Old English such as –tun, meaning farmstead, and Leah meaning clearing.

According to the Domesday Survey of 1086, Tameside was divided into four manors, Tintwistle, Hollingworth, Werneth, and Mottram. The land east of the River Tame was in the Hundred of Hamestan in Cheshire and held by the Earl of Chester while to the west of the river was in the Hundred of Salford under Roger de Poitevin. These manors were divided to create further manors so that by the 13th century most of them were owned by local families and remained in the hands of the same families until the 16th century. Manorialism continued as the main form of administration and governance until the mid-19th century. 

The Industrial Revolution had a significant impact on Tameside; the area, whose main towns had previously been Ashton-under-Lyne and Mottram-in-Longdendale, was transformed from a collection of the rural, farming communities into mill towns. The towns of Ashton-under-Lyne, Dukinfield, Hyde, Mossley and Stalybridge have been described as “amongst the most famous mills towns in the North West”. With only a brief interruption for the Lancashire Cotton Famine of 1861 to 1865, factories producing and processing textiles were the main industry in Tameside from the late-18th century until the mid-20th century.

In 1964, Dukinfield Borough Council convened a meeting of neighbouring local authorities with the aim of formulating a policy of cross-authority social improvement for the districts in the Tame Valley. Following deindustrialisation, the area had suffered “gross neglect” and had large areas of housing unsuitable for human habitation. This joint enterprise comprised the nine districts that would become Tameside ten years later, plus the County Borough of Stockport. This collective agreed on creating “a linear park in the valley [of the River Tame] for the use of the townspeople and as a major recreational resource within the Manchester metropolis”.

Tameside was created on 1 April 1974, by the Local Government Act 1972 as one of the ten metropolitan districts of Greater Manchester. It took over the local government functions of nine districts which were formerly in the administrative counties of Lancashire and of Cheshire. Including the municipal boroughs of Ashton-under-Lyne, Dukinfield, Hyde, Mossley and Stalybridge, and the urban districts of Audenshaw, Denton, Droylsden and Longendale. In 1986 Tameside effectively became a unitary authority with the abolition of the Greater Manchester County Council.

A name for the metropolitan borough proved problematic. The Redcliffe-Maud Report had used the name Ashton-Hyde, but double-barrelled names were prohibited for the new districts. Had Ashton-under-Lyne been a county borough, or had had a less common name, “it might have been chosen as the new name” for the new district. The eight other towns objected, adamant that “a new name should be found”. Thirty suggestions were put forward, including Brigantia, Clarendon, Hartshead, Kayborough, Tame, Ninetowns, and West Pennine, with Hartshead (with reference to Hartshead Pike) being the most popular throughout most of the consultation period. However, the name Tameside (with reference to the River Tame, but a concocted name with no historical basis) won 15 votes to Hartshead’s 10 in a final stage of voting.

Greater Manchester Combined Authority

Greater Manchester is one of the country’s most successful city regions. Home to more than 2.8 million people and with an economy bigger than that of Wales or Northern Ireland. Our vision is to make Greater Manchester one of the best places in the world to grow up, get on and grow old. We’re getting there through a combination of economic growth, and the reform of public services.

The Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) is made up of the ten Greater Manchester councils and Mayor, who work with other local services, businesses, communities and other partners to improve the Greater Manchester City Region.

The ten councils (Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan) have worked together voluntarily for many years on issues that affect everyone in the region, like transport, regeneration and attracting investment.

Our services

  1. Professional carpet cleaning
  2. Professional upholstery cleaning
  3. Oven cleaning
  4. End of tenancy cleaning
  5. Office cleaning
  6. Professional commercial cleaning

Areas we cover in Tameside

Ashton-Under-Lyne, Audenshaw, Broadbottom, Carrbrook, Denton, Droylsden, Dukinfield, Heyrod, Hollingworth, Hyde, Matley, Millbrook, Mossley, Mossley Cross, Mottram, Stalybridge, Woolley Bridge.

If you would like more information on our services, please contact us.